Sunday, January 31, 2010

Working on a Book

I have had this idea to self publish a book with some of my images for some time. I needed a creative writer to collaborate with, providing prose and/or thoughtful words to go along with my images. I found that writer in December, and we've started the process. We have five images done out of thirty. Another exciting journey has begun.

Friday, January 22, 2010


I was interviewed for the blog univers d'artistes, a blog for fine art nudes. I'm posting the entire interview:
1. How and when did your passion for photography begin?

My love and passion for photography began at a very young age. I was always picking up my parent’s brownie camera, or having it handed to me to take family pictures.

2. Who are your photographic role models and why?

I tend to enjoy the works of both historic photographers like Man Ray, Ansel Adams, and Henry Cartier-Bresson, but have also been drawn to fashion photographer’s like Richard Avedon and Marco Glaviano. All of the mentioned photographer’s created works of art, crafting their trade for many years.

3. What or who is your favorite photographic subject and why?

I love the beauty of the landscape, its many shapes and textures, the beauty of the female form blending within the landscape, and historic places/things of interest. I’m hoping to explore more areas of this country, and eventually visit Europe, with its historic architecture from centuries past.

4. What do you like to do in your “spare time” , when you don’t have a camera in tow?

With or without a camera in tow, I enjoy being out in nature, letting my mind breathe. So often, we allow little distractions to upset our balance. Nature helps me retain that balance. I feel exercise is an important function. Our body, like a machine, needs to be used in order for the parts to continue working properly.

5. When looking for models for creative artistic endeavors, which traits in the model are most important to you and why?

I enjoy working with models that feel comfortable working in the woods. Models have told me how comfortable they feel being naked out in nature. The photo shoot tends to flow positively from beginning to conclusion.

6. What do you consider your greatest photographic accomplishment to this point, and what is your biggest aspiration?

In 2004, I Received the South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship Grant for Visual and Media Artists. This is one of the most prestigious awards given to artists in the United States, having been judged by local and national artists. I hope to achieve both national and international recognition for my work.

7. Any future creative projects you would like to share with us?

I am collaborating with a Creative Writer to produce my first book. We’re just in the infancy stages of this project, but I’ll keep you posted.

8. You work mostly with film. What exactly drives that choice of medium? What is your take on the film vs. digital debate?

When going on a shoot, I carry my full arsenal of cameras, 35mm and medium format for film, and my digital. I don’t understand why after shooting in digital, the need to “sharpen” an image is part of the process. I like the feel of film, and its results. I shoot primarily black & white in film, for its amazing eye quality textures. By eye quality, I mean that film demonstrates more closely to what the naked eye sees.

9. How would you describe your photographic style?

My work can best be described as sensual and serene. As I mentioned before, nature helps me preserve my balance. That sense is in turn displayed in my work.

10. Where can we find your work?

Currently, I am represented by the Mark Gallery here in Stuart, Florida. It can be seen in a few fine homes in Martin and Palm Beach County, Florida. Please take the time to visit my website at

Thursday, January 14, 2010

Words of Wisdom

"As humans, we rely greatly on the environment; often times we forget just
how much it relies on us. That's why each of us plays a vital role in the
protection of this precious resource."

Henry David Thoreau - "Life Without Principle", 1863

Monday, January 4, 2010

Traditional vs. Digital Darkroom

I have to admit that at times the digital darkroom can outperform the traditional darkroom. Several of my images are quite busy, which makes it difficult to dodge and burn in all those nooks and crannies. The digital darkroom is better suited for that, and can produce a consistent print every time. Just save it to file and you're ready to print on demand.